CONSIDER A CO-HOST

We strongly recommend co-hosting your JOG with someone else for several reasons:

  • Jesus sent people out two by two; it’s fun to do ministry together.
  • Inviting your friends is often the most difficult part of hosting a JOG, and hosting with a friend can make it easier to extend invitations to more people.
  • Having a co-host is helpful to lighten the load of coordinating logistics such as meals, AV, and venue needs, especially if you are facilitating the JOG as well as hosting it.

Here is a great tool to help recruit a friend to be your co-host:

SAMPLE INVITATION

This is an example of an email that you can forward to friends. Click on this envelope and it will take you to a full invitation.

JOG Invitation Envelope

Once a venue is booked, contact Generous Giving with details. At this point, we will provide you with an electronic invitation to send to those you plan to invite.

RESOURCES FOR INVITING FRIENDS

The Story of Generous Giving

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Why Attend a Journey of Generosity

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Why Attend a Journey of Generosity PDF

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INVITATION LANGUAGE

Over the last several years of inviting people to Generous Giving experiences, we have found some language that is helpful in that process. The following information is intended to share some of that language with you so that it can inform you as you adapt it to your own situation. In almost every case, our favorite phrase is this:

I’ve experienced you as a generous person, and I’d like to invite you to an experience where you’ll be around other people that are like you and will encourage you in an area that I know is important to you.

That language is important because people tend to naturally read into things from their own insecurity, imagining that you are saying, “I’d like you to come to Generous Giving because I don’t think you’re generous.” See the scenarios below for some additional ideas.

  • I am a giver inviting friends
    Personalize this invitation especially from your own experience – talk about what you’ve experienced and invite your friends to be part of that. I am attempting to live this message in my own life, and I could use the encouragement of others who are in it with me. I’d love for you to come into an environment where we can experience this journey together. I like you, and want to hang out with you!
  • I am a ministry leader inviting my board:
    You are investing meaningfully in the mission of our organization. In order to accomplish our goals we need to further a culture of generosity among our constituents. I know that an overnight retreat is a significant request, but I need your help. I’d like for the board to experience and critique a Journey of Generosity before we roll it out among other stakeholders.
  • I am a ministry leader inviting donors:
    You are investing meaningfully in the mission of our organization. This is an event that is totally designed to thank you for that investment and to bless you. You won’t leave this experience feeling like you’re being developed for more funds, but like you’re being encouraged on your journey. This is not a fundraising event. We will not ask you for money at this event, nor will Generous Giving. This event isn’t about our organization at all – it’s a spiritual retreat. It’s a discipleship event FOR you, not a fundraising event looking for something FROM you.
  • I am a pastor inviting my elders:
    You are investing meaningfully in the mission of our church. In order to accomplish our goals we need to further a culture of generosity among our constituents. I know that an overnight retreat is a significant request, but I need your help. I’d like for the elders to experience and critique a Journey of Generosity before we roll it out among the rest of the congregation.
  • I am a pastor inviting church members:
    You are investing meaningfully in the mission of our organization. This is an event that is totally designed to thank you for that investment and to bless you. You won’t leave this experience feeling like you’re being developed for more funds, but like you’re being encouraged on your journey. This is not a fundraising event. We will not ask you for money at this event, nor will Generous Giving. This event isn’t about our church at all – it’s a spiritual retreat. It’s a discipleship event FOR you, not a fundraising event looking for something FROM you. As a church, we are looking for ways to cultivate peoples’ spiritual gifts. We’ve realized we do very little to cultivate the gift of giving, other than asking those people for money. This experience is designed to affirm and encourage those with the gift of giving and to say thank you for your contribution.
  • I am an advisor inviting clients:
    One of the things I’ve observed as a financial advisor is that my clients who are generous experience greater joy and fulfillment in life, so I’m hosting this experience to invite my important clients to experience the joy of giving. This message has blessed me and I want to share it with others in a safe environment where there is no personal agenda from me or from Generous Giving.
  • I am an advisor inviting advisors:
    Getting involved with Generous Giving has been the place that I’ve really seen my career and calling come together as a financial advisor, and I’d love to invite you to explore that with me. Come to a conversation around giving that is different than any conversation you’ve ever had before. I’d like for you to experience this because it may be a tool that you can use in your practice as a tool that you can use to deepen your relationships with certain clients. I’ve found that I had to experience this generosity message more deeply for myself before I could really represent it well with clients, and I believe that your engaging the message this way will be beneficial for your work.
  • I am any one inviting influencers:
    A primary issue keeping the North American Church from meaningful spiritual growth is materialism. I found an organization who exists to combat materialism without asking for anything for themselves. Will you join me by participating in this experience to evaluate whether it’s a tool that we can deploy in our community (or elsewhere) to help others embrace a joyful life of biblical generosity.

OVERCOMING BARRIERS

When asked to enumerate their most pressing needs, few will list, “I need to focus on being more generous.” Inviting your friends to a Journey of Generosity (JOG) can be uncomfortable and challenging. Your friends are not likely to articulate the below barriers to you, but you may want to address these barriers proactively. Some barriers are listed here with language that we use to encourage our friends to press through their objections.

  • “I’m already generous. Why do I need this?”
    We have found that mutual encouragement with a group of committed givers makes our giving more joyful, more intentional, and more biblical. Most of our givers give away 10-20% of their income. It’s worth taking 24 hours or less than 0.3% of your year to think about how you use that 10-20% of your income. Even those who are extremely generous have talked about JOGs as a periodic “generosity tune up.”
  • “I can’t get away for a night.”
    Is there anything that we can do to make the logistics easier for you? Can we help find an overnight babysitter for you? The reason we believe in an overnight retreat is that we so seldom have time to step back from daily life and really give God our full attention for a prolonged period of time. It will be tough to create space, but I’m sure that you’ll find it rewarding and life-giving to invest some time in hearing from the Lord.
  • “My money is private.”
    The purpose of a JOG isn’t to discuss our financial specifics with one another. The purpose is to think about financial generosity at a higher level, how God wants us to think, biblically, about generosity. I guarantee that you will not be pressured toward transparency into your income, assets, or levels of giving. That said, I’d encourage you to think about whether some financial accountability might be fruitful for you. We know that bringing various parts of our lives into the light can be extremely rewarding and life-giving. What makes our money different?
  • “I don’t know the other attendees and that makes me uncomfortable.”
    As the host, I’ve hand-picked a few friends that I think will have a lot in common. As you know, we’re blessed to have been entrusted with much and the ways we deal with money wouldn’t resonate with many of our friends. So it’s true that these will be some new relationships for you, but I need you to trust me that these are great brothers and sisters whom I think you’ll enjoy. JOG attendees often end up finding out that they have lots in common and end up forging deep friendships.
  • “I’m not sure what your agenda is.”
    One reason that JOGs have been such a success around the world is that there is no financial agenda. No one wants anything from you; we want something for you: the ability to walk in the freedom and joy of biblical generosity. I’m covering the costs of the venue and the food; Generous Giving, who is backed by a private foundation, covers the materials and the facilitator costs. You won’t be asked for money ever. We are zealous in ensuring that we’re talking about generosity generally, encouraging you to be generous as God leads and not pushing you toward any specific expression of generosity.
  • “I’d love to, but I’m just busy during that time.”
    No worries. I’m thinking of doing these periodically. Would you like me to keep you in the loop for future sessions like this? I’ve just got to share this experience with you sometime.

THE JOG APP

Keep this app handy whenever you’re hosting or thinking of hosting a JOG. Here you will have all the most current resources at your fingertips. Easily organized in three sections, it helps you share the most relevant information.


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